Top Ten Tuesday #16: Books I Wish Could Have Sequels

August 6: Top Ten Books I Wish Could Have Had Sequels

  • The Night Circus, by Erin Morgenstern. The Night Circus is one of my favorite books. Actually, this pretty much goes for the next three, too. These four books are, in my opinion, great examples of the “perfect” stand-alone novel. I love the “Circus of Dreams”, experiencing it, reading the underlying plot, everything. This book was amazing, and as much as I’d love for there to be a 20-book-series, it’s ending was incredibly well-done, and I have to agree with the author that a sequel probably wouldn’t be the best idea (though I am hoping for a book of short stories, which the author has mentioned as a possibilities, simply because I did really love the setting/characters so much).
  • A Monster Calls, by Patrick Ness. This is quite possibly the book that has struck me the most. It’s a truly amazing book, and I haven’t met a single person so far that hasn’t loved the book. It’s amazing, and it’s great as a stand-alone. But since I love it so much, a part of me does wish there could be sequels somehow.
  • The Book Thief, by Markus Zusak. This follows almost exactly with the book above—AMC and the Book Thief both moved me more than other books have. I’d love to just keep reading and reading and reading this story, yet it too is great as a standalone, and I’m not sure I would actually want a sequel, even if I wish there could be.
  • The Prestige, by Christopher Priest. I love magicians (another reason The Night Circus was so awesome), and I love the characters here. Not to mention the awesome structure of this novel. This is a great stand-alone book, but I wouldn’t mind reading more about these characters.
  • Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien. I mean this could really just be replaced with “anything by Tolkien.” Tolkien is without a doubt one of the greatest writers ever. And his characters/settings are fantastic. I’d love for there to be more, though LOTR is definitely a “perfect trilogy” with a great beginning, climax (or eucatastrophe, as Tolkien puts it), and ending.
  • The Last Man, by Vince Flynn. Or you could say the Mitch Rapp series. I loved these books. Vince Flynn is actually one of the authors that got me into reading. It was a huge tragedy that he passed away so young a few weeks ago, and I will definitely miss his Mitch Rapp books.
  • And Then There Were None, by Agatha Christie. Another example of a “perfect standalone.” I mean, to be expected—Agatha Christie is truly a master, and this is one of my favorite books. The experience reading this story was truly haunting, and I’d love for there to be some sort of sequel somehow, though of course that’s not exactly possible. =P
  • The Phantom Tollbooth, by Norton Juster. Come on, who didn’t love this book? I’d love to follow Milo around on more adventures.
  • Harry Potter, by J.K. Rowling. Among other books, I guess. But I did really enjoy this series, and a small part of me wishes there could be more (but, as is the case with all of these, it’s perfectly understandable [and even a good thing] that there aren’t).
  • Various Classics, such as The Great Gatsby, To Kill a Mockingbird, etc. Obvious choice is pretty obvious—these books are so renowned for a reason: they’re great books. It’d be awesome to stay with the characters forever, yet the books by themselves are great.
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